• Pearl Harbor marks 71st anniversary
    By
     | December 08,2012
     
    AP PHOTO

    Gabi Shultz, 10, a resident of Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, meets Pearl Harbor survivor Sam Clower, center, of Sacramento, Calif., and Ab Brum, right, retired United States Army Special Forces, of Kaneohe, Hawaii, Friday at Pearl Harbor.

    PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii — More than 2,000 people at Pearl Harbor and many more around the country marked the 71st anniversary of the Japanese attack that killed thousands of people and launched the United States into World War II.

    The USS Michael Murphy, a recently christened ship named after a Pearl Harbor-based Navy SEAL killed in Afghanistan, sounded its ship’s whistle Friday to start a moment of silence at 7:55 a.m., marking the exact time the bombing began in 1941.

    Crew members lined the edge of the Navy guided-missile destroyer in the harbor where the USS Arizona and USS Utah, battleships that sank in the attack, still lie. Hawaii Air National Guard F-22 fighter jets flew overhead in a special “missing man” formation to break the silence.

    “Let us remember that this is where it all began. Let us remember that the arc of history was bent in this place 71 years ago today and a generation of young men and women reached deep and rose up to lead our nation to victory,” Rhea Suh, Interior Department assistant secretary, told the crowd. “Let us remember and be forever grateful for all of their sacrifices.”

    About 30 survivors, many using walkers and canes, attended the commemoration.

    Edwin Schuler, of San Jose, Calif., said he remembered going up to the bridge of his ship, the USS Phoenix, to read a book on a bright, sunny Sunday morning in 1941 when he saw planes dropping bombs.

    “I thought: ‘Whoa, they’re using big practice bombs.’ I didn’t know,” said Schuler, 91.

    Schuler said he’s returned for the annual ceremony about 30 times because it’s important to spread the message of remembering Pearl Harbor.

    Ewalt Shatz, 89, said returning to Pearl Harbor “keeps the spirit going, the remembering of what can happen.”

    Shatz, who now lives in Riverside, Calif., was on board the USS Patterson that morning when the alarm sounded. His more experienced shipmates were down below putting a boiler back together so Shatz found himself manning a 50-caliber machine gun for the first time. The Navy credited him with shooting a Japanese plane.

    “That was some good shooting,” said U.S. Pacific Fleet commander Adm. Cecil Haney who recounted Shatz’ experience in the keynote address. “Thank you for your courage and tenacity — our nation is truly grateful.”

    Online, Pearl Harbor became a popular topic on Facebook and other social networks, trending worldwide on Twitter and Google Plus as people marked the anniversary with status updates, personal stories of family and photos.

    The Navy and National Park Service, which is part of the Interior Department, hosted the ceremonies held in remembrance of the 2,390 service members and 49 civilians killed in the attack.

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